Tuesday, 27 October 2009

27/10/2009: Kubang Semang (Penang)

Upon my arrival, I was greeted by a huge flock of foraging Black-winged Stilts. Being one of my all-time favourites, they naturally caught my immediate attention - all 117 of them. I find these birds to be most graceful when they go about their daily routines. That's why I have nicknamed them the Marshland Ballerinas.

These handsome fellows are the males...

These lovely ladies the females...

And together they make an attractive couple...

I managed to pick out a lone Grey-headed Lapwing foraging among the stilts. I guess the rest of its companions have not arrive at their winter destination yet.

The lighting conditions were quite favourable this morning. The "golden light" effect on this resting Little Ringed Plover provided a great photographic opportunity.

Another pleasant find this morning was this flock of Curlew Sandpipers. It is so much easier to photograph these waders in freshwater habitat than in coastal mudflats. The close distance is one of the major factors.

The Wood Sandpipers are back in their usual numbers.

And so have the Common Sandpipers. This fellow is enjoying some time in the sun when I came across it and it was kind enough to let me take a couple of shots.

The Pond-herons are in their indistinguishable winter plumages. I have to wait till March before I can start scouting for all the 3 species - again. It seems like an annual routine for me but these birds really are striking when they sport their summer plumages.

Just a handful of Cattle Egrets were seen today. The rest are most probably foraging at other sections of this vast expanse of paddy fields.

The Little Egrets were rather confiding this time around and were not really bothered by my presence.

Little Egrets are also very graceful when foraging and are strong contenders for the title of Marshland Ballerinas.

Killing 2 birds with 1 stone. Personally, I don't really fancy this old phrase...

The House Crows are too busy feeding to bother the other birds in the vicinity - for the time being anyway.

The White-throated Kingfisher may not be a constant menace to other birds but it will take small and young birds as prey occasionally.

The Brown Shrike may be a bold hunter but it is certainly quite shy of human approach. Here are some the distance shots I managed to capture of this little predator...

I rest my case...

On the other hand, the peaceful Paddyfield Pipit is rather tolerant to human approach.

4 comments:

Wilma said...

Fabulous series of photographs!

Choy Wai Mun said...

Thanks, Wilma

Anonymous said...

Glad to see those Black Wing Stilts
are back.
Choo Eng.

terence said...

Seeing your photo...
I think it is time for me to go there again.