Monday, 2 May 2016

One for the road

On our second last day in Japan, we decided to visit Ueno Park on the outskirts of Tokyo. Come to think of it, it is more like our last day because we have to catch a very early flight home tomorrow and I hope Japan will provide a memorable parting gift to me by providing a few more lifers. Apparently, Ueno Park is a great place for waterbirds especially ducks but the trip did not start off well. Dark clouds and occasional drizzle threatened to spoil our plans for the day. As we got off the train and made our way to the park, not only did the weather not improved but strong winds decided to join in the foray. And I fear that my birding excursion at Ueno Park will be short lived. I intended to spend more time at the lake area for the waterbirds and with the current weather, it could well be my sole salvation.


The first bird that greeted us as we walked along the access trail that cuts through the lake was this lone Grey Heron. I am aware of the saying that the grass is always greener on the other side but I find the Grey Herons here in Japan more attractive than the ones back home in Malaysia. Perhaps happy birds tend to be more appealing. This one certainly does not have to worry about its home being destroyed in the name of development and it certainly does not need to look over its shoulder every minute just be sure to be there is no catapult or gun-totting human sneaking up on it.


I have been trying to obtain good photographs of the Great Cormorant ever since I saw my first one a few days back. Each time I tried the distance between me and this fascinating waterbird was just too great. When I saw one drying itself just next to the trail, I said a silent prayer and approached with caution. I cannot be certain if it was the prayer or this individual was confiding but I was elated that I managed to obtain the type of photos I have been dreaming of.


I took my time with the cormorant and captured a few more images to satisfy my obsession. Thanks, bud...



Yours truly enjoying his last day out in the field for this trip...


My presence near the water’s edge did not go unnoticed. It is quite certain that the birds at this lake are used to human handouts despite the presence of notice boards that forbid the feeding of birds. A flock of Tufted Ducks made a bee line to my position and they appeared like birds with a mission. I was a little taken aback from this bold behaviour.


A few years ago, I had to drive 200km to see my first ever Tufted Duck in Malaysia. Today, I had to actually step back in order to get the whole duck into frame easier. At this close, one can truly appreciate the true beauty and vibrancy of the Tufted Duck. They even had my wife’s attention for quite a long while. It is not surprising. The striking black and plumage with a tinge of iridescent on the face would have won over anyone. And let’s not forget the wicked tuft of a crest...







The female Tufted Ducks lacks the striking colours of the male birds and the crest. I did intentionally ignore them but they were greatly outnumbered by the males.


Although the main bloom is over here, there are still some traces of how spectacular it must have been – much to the delight of my better half. At least I did not made feel so bad for exposing her to nasty weather so that I can spend some time to observe and photograph birds.


There is a small island in the lake and it is full of reeds. Not surprising I saw some of the commoner rails like this Common Moorhen foraging at the edge of the reeds.



A few Eurasian Coots were also present and I took a few shots of the one that was resting nearest to where I had position myself. To be honest, I expected to find more waterbirds. There is a notice that depicts at least half a dozen species of ducks that supposedly occur here but so far, I have only seen one. Anyway, that is birding and this unpredictability can sometimes truly test your mettle as a birder.


One bird that you will not miss at this lake is the Black-tailed Gull. Found in good numbers and having literally no fear of humans, shooting this species was a walk in the park. I do realise that is only a bleeding gull but it is one bleeding beautiful gull. Did I mention it has three colours on its bill?



The short concrete poles that hold the rope barrier at the water’s edge is one of their favourite perches. Shooting a predominantly white bird can be a challenge especially in strong light. Today’s overcast sky was a blessing in disguise as it made the exposure rather ideal.



Judging from the number of Black-tailed Gulls present here, I assume life is good for these highly adaptable birds as well. I think it is safe to say it is good for all the other bird as well.


There were quite a number of Black-headed Gulls present on these poles as well but inevitably, they were overshadowed by the much larger Black-tailed Gulls. It was only recently that a couple of Black-headed Gulls started to winter regularly in Malaysia along the northern shoreline of mainland Penang. So, seeing them in such numbers takes a little getting used to. I even have the liberty to pick and choose which one I want to photograph and I decided to get obtain the plumage differences found in the gulls present. Here is a juvenile...


This is an adult in winter plumage...


Despite a careful search, I failed to find one in its striking summer plumage. The closest were a few individuals that were starting to moult into summer plumage.


I expected to see Spot-billed Ducks as they are quite common throughout Tokyo. I guess they like to make an entrance and came fashionably late to greet me.


I thought the Tufted Ducks were determined when they zeroed in on me like crocodiles on the hunt but the Spot-billed Ducks, took a step further. They left the water and walked right up to me!


There were very few “land” birds present due to the strong winds and drizzle. A few White-cheeked Starlings were foraging on the grassy patches. The weather conditions probably made the starlings a little sluggish and I got some decent close up shots that were not affected by motion blur. The amount of white on the head region of the males seem to vary and I am not sure if it is age related. Some have just enough white to appear normal to me.


Some have nearly completely white heads and the black piercing eyes give them a slightly eerie look.
I enjoyed observing these starlings as I do watching the mynas back home. Starlings and mynas are closely related and I feel some starlings appear and behave more like mynas than starlings. The White-cheeked Starling is one of them. Full of character and mischievous, they are the best remedy to get over gloomy skies like today. This is the first time we experienced rain in Japan. I thought I left the rain back home when we left tropical Malaysia. Looks like I was wrong.




To wrap things up for my excursion to Ueno Park and since it will be my last bit on birding in Japan, I present to you one of the commonest birds in Japan – the feral Pigeon. This is yet another bird that will approach you and not the other way round. They will stroll between your feet and even stop and beg for food – much like a cat or a dog. I find it cute but I could not give in to their antics. They are a feral species and if their population is not kept in check, the native birds will be affected.


I bet this one just had a hearty breakfast...



My wife and I spend eight days exploring Tokyo and Kyoto and their surrounding areas. The cold climate, high standard of living and the language barrier are some of the drawbacks that we faced. However, the drawbacks are quite insignificant compared to all the memorable and wonderful experiences we obtained during our short stay here. And I was a real happy man. The birding was incredible. Some of the encounters were truly remarkable. But time flies when you are having a good time and soon, it will be back to the humid and pest-infested birding in my beloved tropical Malaysia.

7 comments:

John Holmes said...

We get many of these in winter here in HK, so it's always good to see them in breeding plumage "at home".

David Gascoigne said...

I am quite partial to gulls so I enjoyed your shots. Obviously you had a fine time in Japan - with no earthquake! Now you have to come to Canada so that I can help you to find many great species here.

Linda said...

Absolutely gorgeous photos! Warm greetings from Montreal, Canada.

Choy Wai Mun said...

Yes, David. We had a great time there. Thank you for your offer.

Thank you, Linda.

Russell Jenkins said...

Magnificent pictures, Choy. You got better results here in your short time than I have after many years. Glad you had a good time.

Choy Wai Mun said...

Thank you for your compliment, Russell! It certainly was a good visit.

kezonline said...

Another interesting posting and what super timing for that great cormorant spanning it's wings.